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Academic Advising

 

Academic Advising


Fall 2020 Update: The Advising Hive will remain closed for the Fall 2020 semester. Please make virtual appointments using the links below. Your advisors are also available via email and phone. Hover over or click on the advisors in each department for their contact information.

 

The Advising Hive
Crocker Science Center, Room 240
office@science.utah.edu

Weekly Virtual Pop-In Hours:

Mondays, 1 - 3 PM

All departments will be available for quick questions during these hours each week. Enter one of the virtual waiting rooms via the buttons below.


Biology Advisors

Denise Brenes

Biology Advisor
 801-581-6244
 denise.brenes@utah.edu

Denise Brenes

Biology Advisor
JTB Rm 220
 801-581-6244
 denise.brenes@utah.edu

Jessica Vernon

Biology Advisor
 801-581-6244
 jessica.vernon@utah.edu

Jessica Vernon

Biology Advisor
JTB Rm 220
 801-581-6244
 jessica.vernon@utah.edu

Mark Campbell

Biology Advisor
 801-581-6244
 mark.a.campbell@utah.edu

Mark Campbell

Biology Advisor
JTB Rm 220
 801-581-6244
 mark.a.campbell@utah.edu

Nicole Shoup

Biology Advisor
 801-581-6244
 nicole.shoup@utah.edu

Nicole Shoup

Biology Advisor
JTB Rm 220
 801-581-6244
 nicole.shoup@utah.edu

Chemistry Advisors

Tascha Knowlton

Chemistry Advisor
 801-585-7284
 natascha.knowlton@utah.edu

Tascha Knowlton

Chemistry Advisor
HEB 2112
 801-585-7284
 natascha.knowlton@utah.edu

Emily Platt

Chemistry Advisor
 801-587-0645
 emily.platt@utah.edu

Emily Platt

Chemistry Advisor
CSC 240
 801-587-0645
 emily.platt@utah.edu

Mathematics Advisors

Angie Gardiner

Mathematics Advisor
 801-581-6837
 advisor@math.utah.edu

Angie Gardiner

Mathematics Advisor
LCB 214
 801-581-6837
 advisor@math.utah.edu

Natasha Carlton

Mathematics Advisor
 801-587-0648
 advisor@math.utah.edu

Natasha Carlton

Mathematics Advisor
CSC 240
 801-587-0648
 advisor@math.utah.edu

Physics & Astronomy Advisor

Cyri Dixon

Physics & Astronomy Advisor
 801-587-0650
 cyri.dixon@utah.edu

Cyri Dixon

Physics & Astronomy Advisor
CSC 240
 801-587-0650
 cyri.dixon@utah.edu

General Education Requirement Form

If you see transfer courses on your Degree Audit that you think should clear General Education requirements, but aren’t doing so, and you are a College of Science major, please submit the General Education Requirement petition form.


 

Scholarships, Grants & Financial Aid

Scholarships for first-year, undergraduate and graduate students.

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Academic Resources

Resources for academic success.

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Late Withdrawals

Withdrawal instructions and downloadable Petition forms.

Read More
Student Wellness

Tools for you to maintain a safe and healthy life both in and out of class.

Read More
Student Visas

Proposed changes in visa restrictions have been rescinded.

Read More

Goldwater Scholarship

GOLDWATER SCHOLARSHIP


The Goldwater Foundation awards $7,500 scholarships to outstanding undergraduate students in the spring of 2021 for the 2021-22 academic year.

Awards are made on the basis of merit to students who have outstanding potential and intend to pursue research careers in mathematics, natural sciences, or engineering. The University of Utah may nominate up to four students each academic year. Applicants must be a current sophomore or junior pursuing a bachelor degree, have a minimum GPA of 3.0 or higher, and be a US citizen, US national, or permanent resident.

Goldwater scholarships are awarded to students who have been nominated by their educational institution. The University of Utah internal deadline to apply is November 23, 2020. To be considered for nomination all materials including letters of recommendation must be submitted by the internal deadline.

Goldwater Nomination Process

Candidates must complete pre-screening BEFORE they are allowed to apply.

  • Complete Student Profile and Pre-Application at  https://goldwater.scholarsapply.org.
  • Contact three research or academic faculty members to provide a letter of recommendation.
  • Provide each faculty member a signed FERPA_Release_for Goldwater (pdf).
  • Provide the names and email addresses of the recommenders when you submit the Pre-Application.
  • Goldwater Pre-Applications will be reviewed within 7 days. If you meet the eligibility screening for the award you will be given access to the Goldwater online application.

Goldwater Application Process


To be considered for scholarship nomination all materials, including letters of recommendation, must be submitted by the University deadline of November 23, 2020. The January 2021deadline as mentioned in the Goldwater Foundation announcement is the deadline for nominations to the Goldwater Foundation.

  • Goldwater Online Application form: Submitted by candidate
  • Backpack (document upload area in online application form) must contain:
    • 1 Research Essay (uploaded by candidate)
    • 3 Letters of Recommendation (uploaded by Campus Representative)
    • University of Utah Transcript (uploaded by Campus Representative)
    • Official transcripts from other institutions attended, if applicable (candidate requests transcript to be sent to Campus Representative to be uploaded)
    • 1 Copy of a Permanent Resident Card (if the candidate is a Permanent Resident – uploaded by the candidate)
    • 1 Letter of Intent to Become a U.S. Citizen (if the candidate is a Permanent Resident – uploaded by the candidate)

Essays should be single spaced and use 12-point Arial font, must not exceed 3 pages. Margins should be 1 inch on all sides. Include your name and institution name at the top of each page.

Zhao Scholarship

Taylor is the first recipient of the Michael Zhao Memorial Scholarship. She’s a senior majoring in mathematics and minoring in computer science and plans to graduate in the spring of 2020.

“The financial assistance provided by the scholarship will be of great help to me in paying for my educational expenses, and it will allow me to concentrate more of my time on studying,” said Walker. “After graduating, I plan on entering the workforce in a math related field. I hope to honor Michael’s legacy in mathematics as I continue to learn about a subject we both enjoy.”

Michael Zhao loved sushi, travel and classical music. His lifelong passion and ardent pursuit, however, was always mathematics. His fascination with math took him from the 100 Club in kindergarten to Cambridge University as a Churchill Scholar. On December 8, 2018, while at Columbia University in New York City chasing his goal of becoming a college professor, Zhao passed away due to a sudden heart attack.

But on April 18, Zhao’s zeal for math continued with the naming of the first recipient of the Michael Zhao Memorial Scholarship. Taylor Walker, a senior studying mathematics and computer science, is the first awardee.

“The scholarship aims to recognize a truly outstanding mathematics student,” said Davar Khoshnevisan, chair of the Department of Mathematics, “which is consistent with celebrating Michael’s memory.”

Zhao grew up in Salt Lake City and attended Skyline High School, where he was first chair in flute and served as captain of the debate team while also attending Canada/USA Mathcamp and taking math courses at the U. As an undergraduate at the U, Zhao received the Eccles Scholarship that supported his studies in the Honors College. Zhao was intrigued by the breadth of study the Honors College offered—a place where he could read Thomas Aquinas and David Hume, while also studying Eastern philosophy and literature from texts like the Bhagavad Gita and the Daodejing.

In 2017 he was the second U student to win the prestigious Churchill Scholarship. “It’s a common perception that skill in mathematics is only due to talent, but hard work counts for much more” Zhao said. “Having mentors is also extremely helpful, and I am indebted to many faculty members, graduate students, and engineers for their guidance and encouragement.”

Many of the faculty in the U’s Math Department have fond memories of working with Zhao. In an interview in 2017, professor of mathematics Gordon Savin, who served as Michael’s honors thesis advisor, said, “Mike is one of the strongest undergraduate students we have had since I have been at the University of Utah, in more than 20 years. For someone his age, he already has an incredible level of maturity and mathematical knowledge."

He also worked with Dragan Miličić. In the same interview, Miličić said, “We often have discussions on various topics related to algebraic geometry, number theory, and representation theory. I was always impressed that talking to Mike feels more like talking with a colleague and not a student.”

Another professor who worked with Zhao was Braxton Osting, who said, “Many people remember Michael as a brilliant student, excelling under an almost impossible course load covering a large range of topics in mathematics and computer science. In spending time with Michael, I also came to know him as a genuinely kind person, generous with his time and helpful to his fellow students.”

After Zhao passed away, math department faculty and fellow Churchill Scholars approached Khoshnevisan with the idea of establishing a scholarship in Zhao’s name. Khoshnevisan got approval from Zhao’s parents. They, along with colleagues, friends and even his high school math teacher, reached out to their community for donations.

The new scholarship, partly funded by the Department of Mathematics and partly by donors, keeps Zhao’s memory alive. If you’d like to contribute to this scholarship, please make checks payable to the Michael Zhao Memorial Scholarship and send donations to the following: Tiffany Jensen Department of Mathematics 155 South 1400 East, JWB 233 Salt Lake City, UT 84112

2018 Churchill Scholar

Scott Neville receives Utah's third straight Churchill Scholarship.

Scott Neville of Clearfield, Utah, who graduated from the University of Utah in December with a degree in mathematics and in computer science, has received a prestigious Churchill Scholarship to study at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.

He is one of only 15 students in the U.S. to receive the award this year and is the third Churchill Scholar from the U, all of whom are mathematicians.

“Having three Churchill scholars in the last four years is truly remarkable,” said Ruth Watkins, president of the University of Utah. “There is no doubt that Scott will continue to successfully represent the U at Cambridge.”

Neville was drawn to math when he was introduced to the Collatz Conjecture in high school.

“The conjecture is interesting for its simplicity and difficulty, as well as its lack of consequence,” said Neville. “I proved via enumeration and equation manipulation that there was only one cycle with exactly one odd number, and none with exactly two odd numbers. This was a known result, but I was ecstatic. I realized there were unsolved problems in math and I could answer them.”

Neville enrolled at the U because he was already involved in an applied mathematics project with professor Duncan Metcalfe in the Anthropology department. The objective was to investigate infeasible years in radiocarbon dating. The work was funded by the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program.

“This was a good learning experience in both research and communicating mathematics, since the senior researcher had only passing familiarity with the math involved,” says Neville.

The project resulted in a poster given at the Undergraduate Research Symposium in 2016.

“In addition, I knew the U had a rigorous mathematics and computer science program, but I hadn’t actually met any of those professors,” says Neville.

While attending the U, Neville presented his work in Japan, completed advanced courses in modern algebra and number theory, and took second place in the ASFM national collegiate mathematics championship in 2017. He also has co-authored three publications with university faculty.

Neville credits many U faculty for helping him through his undergraduate career. Suresh VenkatasubramanianTommaso de Fernex,Duncan MetcalfeArjun KrishnanAditya BhaskaraPeter Trapaand Gordan Savin were each instrumental in helping him with research, presentations, course work and advising.

Neville aspires to become a professor at a research university so he can continue working on math and sharing it with others.

“I want to give back to a community that’s given so much to me. I want to continue learning and pushing the limits of what mathematics, and hence humanity, can do,” said Neville.

The Churchill Scholarship, established in 1963 at the request of Winston Churchill, provides undergraduates with outstanding academic achievement in the science, technology, engineering and math fields the opportunity to complete a one-year Master’s program at the University of Cambridge. The award is worth about $60,000 in U.S. dollars, depending on the exchange rate.

Candidates go through a rigorous endorsement process in order to apply, but only after their home institution has been vetted with the Winston Churchill Foundation. The U was added to the Foundation in spring 2014.

The Churchill Scholarship has been called “the most academically challenging of the U.K. scholarships.”

Neville will begin his studies at Cambridge in October 2018.