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Notebook 2020

Notebook 2020


Student Emergency Fund

Support students in need.

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Rapid Response Research

Behind-the-scenes story of an NSF Rapid Response Research grant.

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2020 Research Scholar

Delaney Mosier receives top College of Science award.

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Dominique Pablito

Zuni, Navajo and Comanche, student majoring in chemistry and biology.

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2020 Churchill Scholar

Michael Xiao brings home the U's fifth straight Churchill Scholarship.

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Goldwater Winner

Isaac Martin awarded prestigious Goldwater Scholarship.

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50th Anniversary

Science has been part of the University of Utah since the very beginning.

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Goldwater Winner

Lydia Fries awarded prestigious Goldwater Scholarship.

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Ana Rosas

Medicine is a family tradition for the Rosas.

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Alex Acuna

Bridging the knowledge gap with networks of people.

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Dalley Cutler

I want to see sensible climate policies and actions.

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Debate 2020

Election 2020


On October 7, the University of Utah is hosting the 2020 Vice Presidential Debate.

"Civic engagement is a core value of our nation and, as we host the 2020 Vice Presidential debate, Utah students will be able to learn about the political process and experience firsthand how being involved matters." —Ruth V. Watkins, President of the University of Utah

 

Let your voice be heard. VOTE!

Voting may not seem important to science majors and faculty, but participation is incredibly important. A voice for science in federal, state, and local politics provides a crucial point of view for our world. Much of the funding decisions that support scientific research and discovery occurs on the federal level, so what happens in Washington, D.C. impacts our College of Science community.

STEM students least likely to vote.

A Tufts University survey of university students across the US reports that STEM students are the least likely of any subject group to vote. In 2016, the humanities turnout was 53%. The STEM turnout was 43%. The Union of Concerned Scientists provides students with voter registration information and trains scientists for involvement in policy and advocacy.

 

The Condorcet Paradox

Looking for a scientific perspective on our electoral process? Learn how mathematical analysis makes a difference in the political process through this video of Professor Tom Alberts explaining the Condorcet Paradox.

 

Crimson Legacy

Crimson Legacy Society


A planned gift is the easiest way to make a major contribution to help the university advance scientific education and research. Your gift will produce exceptional opportunities for students and faculty.

The Crimson Legacy Society is designed to recognize those who have made a deep commitment to the future of the college. Members will be recognized on the Crimson Legacy donor wall and in the college’s annual Notebook publication. You will also receive special recognition of your support and be inducted into the University’s Park Society.

How do I become a member?
Designate a gift or pledge of $50,000, or more, in your will or estate to either the University of Utah College of Science, the School of Biological Sciences, or one of the departments of Chemistry, Mathematics, or Physics & Astronomy.

What if I already have the college or one of the departments in my will or estate plan?
First of all, thank you! Second, please contact us so we can record the details of the gift.

Please contact Jeff Martin at martin@science.utah.edu or 801-581-4852 for more information.

 

 - First Published in Discover Magazine, Fall 2019

George Elliott

"Always be open to unforeseen possibilities and opportunities; never be afraid to fail, and learn from your failures," says George Elliott (PhD'81). "Don’t get bogged down in a very narrow line of pursuit—the broader your knowledge is the more creative and successful a problem-solver you will be." That's great advice to U Biology students today. And it seems to have been the advice Elliott himself followed back in the day when he was at the U, following his sojourn at University of California, San Diego where he earned his bachelor's.

“My graduate career began in 1973,” says Elliott who with his wife Lissa resides in Virginia. “I was one of only two students accepted into the molecular/cellular/genetics part of the Biology Department that had been newly constructed by K. Gordon Lark. Gordon had hired a dozen or more new professors, mostly young and engaged in a potpourri of cutting edge, exciting research.”

Elliott retired from the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) in 2016 following an auspicious career as, first, a patent examiner, manager and Group Director of the Tech Center responsible for biotechnology and pharmaceutical patent examination, and finally as Deputy Chief Policy Officer for Operations in the Office of Policy and International Affairs.

Stationed in Virginia, Elliott coordinated operations of approximately 45 attorneys and 55 admin and program staff responsible for advising U.S. Government on Intellectual Property matters and representing the U.S. government in IP-related international organizations and negotiations around the world. The Office of the Administrator for Policy and International Affairs at USPTO assists the Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in advising the President, through the Secretary of Commerce, and Federal agencies on domestic and international IP issues as well as on United States treaty obligations.

Elliott’s experience at the University of Utah was formative across the board. While at the U, he chose to work with Marty Rechsteiner, now Distinguished Professor Emeritus in Biochemistry, who was continually coming up with new ways to look at intracellular small and large molecule metabolism. “The lessons I learned working with Marty and in my interactions with [SBS faculty] Toto Olivera, Mario Capecchi, Dana Carroll, Bill Gray and others, stayed with me for the rest of my career, whether in research or at the Patent and Trademark Office.”

With respect to COVID-19, Elliott is reassuring to students who are faced with what seems an unprecedented time during their academic careers. "It will pass, eventually, but everybody should take it seriously," he remarks. "The idea that younger people are somehow in less danger is being proven less and less true all the time. And nobody should think it is only about protecting themselves—it’s all about creating situations where the virus is spread. But students should know that—they just need to act on their knowledge."

George Elliott is more than grateful for his own experience at the U. He is also one of several alumni who have established a mechanism of estate giving to benefit the School of Biological Sciences. When asked why he has made a gift of this kind, he says, “The education I received while getting my PhD from U Biology was instrumental in providing us with a very enjoyable life together, and we feel it is very important to ensure that the programs that we benefited from can continue to the benefit of those who follow.”

by David Pace

About Planned Giving:

Some planned gifts may yield certain federal tax advantages and can even give you an income throughout your lifetime. The College of Science’s Crimson Legacy Society is designed to recognize those who have made a deep commitment to the future of the School of Biological Sciences through cash or planned gifts at the $50,000 level or above.

Members will be recognized on the Crimson Legacy donor wall and in the College's annual Discover publication. They will also receive special tokens of appreciation in recognition of their support.

SCIENCE NOW!

science now: bringing world-class research to your Utah high school


 

 

SCIENCE NOW brings high school physics, chemistry, biology, and mathematics curriculum to life by connecting students to research scientists

Students get an insider’s look at research at the University of Utah College of Science and an opportunity to indulge their curiosity about the natural world, innovation, and the future of science by engaging with elite researchers and scholars.

SCIENCE NOW, established 2020, is a College of Science program that is delivered online, using asynchronous and synchronous tools.

 

 

Audience: We recommend SCIENCE NOW for students in grades 9-12 who are enrolled in physics, mathematics, biology, and/or chemistry (Honors, Advance Placement, and IB students preferred). Parents, faculty, administrators, and advisors are also invited. A SCIENCE NOW event is intended for groups of at least 20 students, up to 100.

Our scientists: 4 research scholars representing each department in the College of Science: 3 scientists (a biologist, chemist, and physicist or astronomer) and a mathematician. Scholars selected for your event are exceptional communicators and educators, highly relatable, and engaged in research that is newsworthy and accessible to a general audience.

 

HOW IT WORKS

SCIENCE NOW is delivered virtually, using event pages customized to the needs of your school. Click on the tabs below to learn more about the synchronous and asynchronous event tools used to connect high school classes to our research scientists.

On the SCIENCE NOW webpages, your students will be introduced to our researchers through research scholar profiles, which will include:

  • Mainstream news features
  • Video lab tours
  • and more!

 

 

 

 

Introducing Research in the College of Science

There are still many challenges to be solved.

 


Science Research Initiative

Research experience for first-year students.

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Admitted Students Day

Celebrate your admission to the U!

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What Can You Do with a Science Degree?

Science career paths.

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SRI Students

Placing first-year students in real science research.

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Transfer Students

Finish your degree at the College of Science.

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Tour the College of Science

Get a sneak peek of campus before the fall semester!

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Live on campus

Unique housing opportunities for science students.

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Scholarships, Grants & Financial Aid

Scholarships for students at the College of Science.

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Why Science?

Connect with the vast opportunities that science and mathematics can unlock.

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ACCESS Scholars

Individuals from all dimensions of diversity who embody excellence, leadership and equity.

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College Rankings

A.A.U. Membership

Student Wellness

Crocker Science House


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Jim Kaschmitter

Armed with optimism and a degree in physics, Jim Kaschmitter BS’72, showed up for his first day on the job at Anaconda Copper’s Research Facility in Salt Lake City only to be told by his supervisor to go home because Chile had just nationalized its copper mines. Undeterred, Kaschmitter found a job with OmniLift Corporation, a Salt Lake City startup that was developing a new type of conveyor system in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the U. While working at the U, Kaschmitter bought one of the first Hewlett Packard HP25 calculators and became fascinated by computers. This fascination has led to a long and successful career in Silicon Valley.

Silicon Valley Beckons
In 1976, Kaschmitter earned a master’s degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University while working for Professor Robert Byer (the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Applied Physics at Stanford’s Applied Physics Department), helping to build laser spectroscopy equipment. He began a Ph.D. program in Applied Physics but dropped out to take a job at Stanford Telecommunications. Inc. (STI) in Mountain View, Calif. STI was founded by the late James Spilker, Jr., who hired Kaschmitter as an early employee. Spilker was one of the inventors of GPS. While at STI, Kaschmitter designed and built a Viterbi convolutional codec (with an encoder and decoder) for satellite communications.

From there Kaschmitter turned his attention to microprocessors, which were then rapidly advancing in Silicon Valley. He co-developed an automated wafer dicing saw using an Imsai 8080 he and his partner purchased from the first Byte Shop in Mountain View, Calif. Interestingly, this shop had the first Apple computer for sale at the time—an unpackaged PCB with a keyboard. After several interim electronics design jobs, Kaschmitter was recruited to Elxsi Corporation, a San Jose startup founded by ex-Digital Equipment Corporation engineers, where he designed the disk subsystem and worked on the IEEE floating point processor and high-speed bus. He became interested in integrated circuit packaging, which led him to apply for a position at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

At LLNL, Kaschmitter undertook several projects, including laser pantography for integrated circuit packaging, image processing, and redundant computing for orbital satellites, solar electric aircraft, and energy storage. In 1987, he co-founded nChip Corporation to commercialize hybrid wafer-scale integration; this technology was later sold to Flextronics. In 1989, Kaschmitter assumed responsibility for developing a low-cost power system for President Reagan’s Star Wars satellite system, but he was frustrated by the expensive, heavy batteries then used in satellites, so he began to investigate lithium-ion, or Li-ion batteries, which were still in the research and development phase. He co-founded PolyStor Corporation in 1993, with a grant from President Clinton’s Technology Reinvestment Project program, and his company subsequently established the first commercial Li-ion manufacturing facility in the U.S. In 1997, he spun off PowerStor Corporation from PolyStor to commercialize a carbon aerogel supercapacitor he’d co-invented at LLNL. PowerStor was subsequently acquired by Cooper Bussmann, Inc., which manufactures 1-2 million supercapacitors per month.

Today, Kaschmitter is CEO of SpectraPower (which he founded in 2002) in Livermore, Calif in order to apply PolyStor’s high-energy Nickel-Cobalt technology for high-altitude electric drones. Initially, the market wasn’t yet ready for the technology, so Kaschmitter subsequently founded UltraCell Corporation to work on reformed methanol micro-fuel cell technology. UltraCell’s fuel cells are deployed today with the U.S. military. In the meantime, Kaschmitter has continued with SpectraPower and now focuses his efforts there on supporting users and developers of Li-based battery technologies.

Memories of the U
“The U is a great school with strong technical departments and academics, especially in the area of physics. The department always had an international outlook but with a supportive small-school atmosphere,” said Kaschmitter. “The students and professors were friendly, approachable, and focused on science. Physics has truly provided the foundation for my career.” He also appreciated the advice provided by Professor Orest Symko, whose insights helped Kaschmitter set personal goals and priorities.

During his undergraduate years, one of his favorite jobs was running the undergraduate Physics Lab, where he maintained and explained basic physics experiments to students. “There have been some stressful times later in my career when I’ve wished I could have that job back!” quipped Kaschmitter.

His advice for undergraduate students is twofold: set career goals and be prepared to work hard to achieve them. As Edison famously said, “Genius is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration.”

“I’d also encourage students to stay “fact-based” in whatever profession they choose,” said Kaschmitter. “Don’t let the zeitgeist or trendy popular ideas control your technical thinking. Weigh different opinions, but trust in facts and data. Learn to separate hype from reality.”

Like many of us, Kaschmitter is facing uncertainties during the pandemic but believes the quarantine can provide us with opportunities for independent work. For example, Sir Isaac Newton invented calculus, optics, etc., while he was quarantined in the English countryside during the Great Plague. “We probably can’t all do that, but I’ve found the quarantine allows me to get a lot of work done without the usual day-to-day distractions,” said Kaschmitter.

When he isn’t working, he makes time for his other love—flying. He has a long-time interest in aviation and first did a solo flight at age 16 at the Salt Lake International Airport. “My instructor was Bill Edde, and I sometimes flew with his older brother, who was a former WWI Spad fighter pilot. Later in my career, while at LLNL, I developed lightweight wing-mounted solar panels for the Pathfinder and Helios solar electric aircraft, which AeroVironment subsequently used to set altitude records,” said Kaschmitter. He currently owns, maintains, and flies an experimental Velocity XL-RG: N568Y.

In summing up his career, Kaschmitter notes his favorite adage: “If you love your work, you’ll never work a day in your life,” and that’s certainly how I feel about my career." He admits physics is not the easiest path academically, but studying it gives students a fundamental understanding of science and technology that will give them an edge over the competition. “I’ve dealt with many venture capitalists in Silicon Valley and worldwide throughout my career,” he said. “Having a technical background is a real asset—the ones without it are at a disadvantage in today’s technology-reliant world.”

 

Academic Resources

Need help?
Start Here.


Achieving a degree in the College of Science can be challenging. Faculty and staff are here to help you succeed!

Below are some services that are intended to empower students to succeed in their course content and develop transferable skills to help them in their academic careers.

Top 5 tips from College of Science advisors:


1. Go to class – and participate.
Class attendance actually does affect your grade. Exams are sometimes based on lectures and not chapters of the book, so it is important to be present in class. Also, instructors will sometimes make important announcements during class pertaining to assignments and exams.

2. Learn how to take notes.
The Learning Center can help you improve on note-taking strategies. Develop good study habits by reviewing your notes often, and writing down questions you have to address with the instructor.

3. Utilize a planner or electronic calendar.
Time management is critical to becoming a successful student. Write down deadlines for items that involve classes, study time, campus activities, and work obligations. Here is the University of Utah’s Academic Calendar for important dates for registration, finals, etc.

4. Don’t be afraid to ask for help – and don’t wait until it’s too late.
Reach out to instructors, TAs, and LAs during their office hours to get help with assignments and other issues relating to the class. Make an appointment with an advisor, and utilize the tutoring resources below!

5. Don’t give up!
We know college can be hard, and life often throws additional challenges your way. You can do this, and we are here to help.

Student Resources

Forms and Tools

COS Advisors are here to help. Make an appointment for a virtual session.

Our DNA 2020

OUR DNA Magazine


OUR DNA, the School of Biological Sciences magazine, is published twice a year. If you do not currently receive our newsletter, please contact us at development@biology.utah.edu to be added to our mailing list.

MORE PUBLICATIONS


 

The Spectrum 2022

Featured: Black Holes, Student Awards, Research Awards, LGBT+ physicists, and more.

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Aftermath 2022

Featured: Student awards, Faculty Awards, Fellowships, and more.

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Notebook 2022

Featured: Student stories, NAS members, alumni George Seifert, and Convocation 2022.

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Our DNA 2022

Featured: Erik Jorgensen, Mark Nielsen, alumni George Seifert, new faculty, and more.

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Discover 2021

Featured: Biology, Chemistry, Math, and Physics Research, SRI Update, New Construction.

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Our DNA 2021

Featured: Multi-disciplinary research, graduate student success, and more.

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Aftermath 2021

Featured: Sound waves, student awards, distinguished alumni, convocation, and more.

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Spectrum 2021

Featured: New science building, faculty awards, distinguished alumni, and more.

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Notebook 2021

Featured: Student awards, distinguished alumni, convocation, and more.

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Spectrum 2021

Featured: Student awards, distinguished alumni, convocation, and more.

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Aftermath 2021

Featured: Sound waves, student awards, distinguished alumni, convocation, and more.

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Our DNA 2021

Featured: Plant pandemics, birdsong, retiring faculty, and more.

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Discover 2020

Featured: Biology, Chemistry, Math, and Physics Research, Overcoming Covid, Lab Safety.

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AfterMath 2020

Featured: 50 Years of Math, Sea Ice, and Faculty and Staff recognition.

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Our DNA 2020

Featured: Stories on e-birders, retiring faculty, remote learning, and more.

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Spectrum 2020

Featured: 3D maps of the Universe, Perovskite Photovoltaics, and Dynamic Structure in HIV.

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Notebook 2020

Featured: Convocation, Alumni, Student Success, and Rapid Response Research.

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Catalyst 2020

Featured: Transition to Virtual, 2020 Convocation, Graduate Spotlights, and Awards.

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Spectrum 2020

Featured: Nuclear Medicine, PER Programs, and NSF grant for Quantum Idea Incubator.

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Discover 2019

Features the Science Research Initiative, College Rankings, Commutative Algebra, and more.

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Spectrum 2019

Featured: Nuclear Medicine, PER Programs, and NSF grant for Quantum Idea Incubator.

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Notebook 2019

Featured: The New Faces of Utah Science, Churchill Scholars, and Convocation 2019.

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Catalyst 2019

Featured: Endowed Chairs of Chemistry, Curie Club, and alumnus: Victor Cee.

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Our DNA 2019

Featured: Ants of the World, CRISPR Scissors, and Alumni Profile - Nikhil Bhayani.

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Catalyst 2019

Featured: Methane- Eating Bacteria, Distinguished Alumni, Student and Alumni profiles.

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Spectrum 2019

Featured: Molecular Motors, Churchill Scholar, Dark Matter, and Black Holes.

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Our DNA 2019

Featured: The Startup Life, Monica Gandhi, Genomic Conflicts, and alumna Jeanne Novak.

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AfterMath 2018

Featured: A Love for Puzzles, Math & Neuroscience, Number Theory, and AMS Fellows.

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Discover 2018

The 2018 Research Report for the College of Science.

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Spectrum 2018

Featured: Dark Matter, Spintronics, Gamma Rays and Improving Physics Teaching.

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Catalyst 2018

Featured: Ming Hammond, Jack & Peg Simons Endowed Professors, Martha Hughes Cannon.

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Prospective Faculty

Why Utah?


 


Utah Recreation

Hiking, biking, running, paddling, skiing, flying, climbing, exploring, and relaxing.

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Explore Salt Lake City

A modern metropolis nestled in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains.

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University Benefits

Medical, dental, retirement, tuition , wellness, and Employee Assistance Program.

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Faculty Stories


Research Funding

Research funding passes $686 million for 2022.

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E.D.I. Committee

Working together for a better tomorrow.

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How Trees Grow

William Anderegg explores the relationship between photosynthesis and cell growth.

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NAS 2022 Membership

Erik Jorgensen and Valeria Molinero are elected to the National Academy of Sciences

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Distinguished Service

Pearl Sandick receives Distinguished Service Award.

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Carbon Nanotubes

Vikram Deshpande had a hunch that carbon nanotubes held promise as a building block.

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IF/THEN Ambassador

The largest collection of statues of women ever assembled.

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2022 ASBMB Fellow

Vahe Bandarian named fellow of the American Society for Biochemistry & Molecular Biology.

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Extraordinary Black Hole

Astronomers recently discovered a black hole unlike any other.

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Of Mice and Monarchs

Are California mice eating monarch butterflies?

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James Webb Space Telescope

The largest and most powerful telescope ever sent into space.

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Biological Data

All thinking is done using modeling, whether it’s through language or mathematics.

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Theory Meets Intuition

Will Feldman studies things most of us take for granted.

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Space Plants

Plants are the future of space travel.

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The Frontier of Physics

Physics beyond the Standard Model.

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Research Funding

Research funding passes $641 million for 2021.

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Fabulous Fungi

SBS faculty Bryn Dentiger explores the possibilities of fungi.

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Darwin’s Pigeon “Enigma”

Darwin's short-beak enigma solved

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Physics Innovation

Yue Zhao Receives Physics Innovation Award.

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William D. Ohlsen

Emeritus Professor William David Ohlsen 1932-2021.

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Be the Light

American Indian Services students visit campus.

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Chemistry in Pictures

Chemistry is so much broader than just a list of elements.

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Birds of the Philippines

What factors put Philippine birds at risk of extinction?

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NSF CAREER Award

Priyam Patel honored with a NSF CAREER Award.

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Mysteries of the Universe

A five-year quest to map the universe began officially on May 17, 2021.

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Let’s Get Kraken

The Sigman Group launches an open-access tool for chemists.

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Camille-Dreyfus Award

Luisa Whittaker-Brooks receives Teacher-Scholar award.

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NAS Membership

Mary Beckerle receives the significant recognition of NAS membership.

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AAAS Membership

Valeria Molinero joins the prestigious ranks of the American Academy.

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Patterns in Sound

Exciting new math research by Fernando Guevara Vasquez.

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Amanda Cangelosi

Mathematics faculty receives U's Early Career Teaching Award.

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Allergy Season

Climate change is making allergy season last longer.

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Sloan Research Fellow

Luisa Whittaker-Brooks awarded prestigious 2021 Sloan Research Fellowship.

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Cottrell Scholar

Gail Zasowski named a Cottrell Scholar.

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The Science of Sea Ice

Ken Golden brings the principles of mathematics to the Earth’s most remote environments.

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Carsten Rott

Carsten Rott appointed to the Jack W. Keuffel Memorial Chair in Physics & Astronomy.

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Mission Unstoppable

Mixing chemistry and martial arts for CBS television.

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Priyam Patel

Visualizing the Topology of Surfaces

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COVID Connections

Creating opportunity during COVID-19

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Karl Schwede

The latest faculty to be named a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society.

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Giant Poisonous Rats

The secret social lives of giant poisonous rats.

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A Catalyst for Safety

Chemistry labs lead the way in university safety.

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Productivity Resources

Resources for faculty to help during the Covid-19 pandemic.

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Next-Gen Astronomy

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is providing groundbreaking insight.

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Debate 2020

STEM students least likely of any subject group to vote in U.S. elections.

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Presidential Scholar

Pearl Sandick has been named a University of Utah Presidential Scholar.

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11 Billion Years

Kyle Dawson and a global consortium of astrophysicists create a 3-D map of the universe.

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HIV Microscopy

Ipsita Saha is using electron microscopy to reveal the dynamic structure in HIV.

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Forest Futures

William Anderegg explains the risks of investing in forests.

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Hedgehogs and Undergrads

Astronomers recently discovered a black hole unlike any other.

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Karl Gordon Lark

Honoring Karl Gordon Lark, 1930-2020.

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Courtship Condos

Why is Dean Castillo managing the sexual relations of fruit flies?

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Tino Nyawelo

I see myself in those kids who are brought here as refugees.

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Running with Scissors

In gene-targeting, CRISPR makes a really good pair of "scissors".

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Electrochemistry

Henry S. White - A positive force in Electrochemistry.

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Commutative Algebra

Can commutative algebra help us solve real-world problems?

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Engaging STEM Students

How can we make STEM education more inclusive and effective?

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TreeTop Barbie

Nalini Nadkarni has created a "Canopy Researcher" version of the popular Barbie doll.

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AMS Fellow

Davar Khoshnevisan, named Fellow of American Mathematical Society.

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Going with the Flow

John Sperry studies how plant hydraulics and xylem tissue influence regional weather.

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Royal Fellow

Christopher Hacon adds another honor of a lifetime to his already stellar resume.

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New Physics

Pearl Sandick discusses Dark Matter and challenging the Standard Model.

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Teaching Excellence

Kelly MacArthur is recognized for her extraordinary dedication to her students.

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Distinguished Research

Professor Molinero’s work is a hallmark of what research and scholarship should be about.

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Distinguished Teaching

Gernot Laicher, Professor/Lecturer in the Department of Physics & Astronomy.

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2019 Hatch Prize

Professor Joel Harris has been awarded the 2019 Hatch Prize for outstanding teaching!

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Associate V.P. for Research

Diane Pataki is now Associate Vice President for Research at the University of Utah.

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Insects, Bacteria & Ice

Water doesn’t always freeze at 32 degrees and other chilling facts from Valeria Molinero.

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AMS Fellow

Tommaso de Fernex, Ph.D. Associate Department Chair of Mathematics.

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AMS Fellow

“I was delighted to learn the news from the AMS,” said Peter Trapa.

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Plant Genomics

QUESTION: How does RNA decay contribute to gene expression?

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Breakthrough Prize

Christopher Hacon, has been interested in math for as long as he can remember.

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Under Pressure

Unravelling the mystery of a fundamental property of lithium.

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