South Physics Building

South Physics Building


  • Completed: 1967
  • Named for: James C. Fletcher, President 1964-1971
  • Architect: ??
  • Style: ??
  • Materials: ??

The Widtsoe building was originally the Physical Science Building. In 1976, this building was remodeled to house the Mathematics Department. Dr. Widtsoe was the author of the laws and by-laws of the first University Constitution.

This building was nearly destroyed by fire on December 19, 1901. but was restored in 1902. In 1911 an addition was constructed on the north side. The interior was remodeled extensively in 1975. This building differs greatly from its companion, the Alfred C. Emery Building, with a non-monumental entrance placed asymmetrically on its facade.

 

The Science Campus


South Biology Building

Thatcher Building

Fletcher Building

Skaggs Building

Eyring Building

Widtsoe Building

Cowles Building

Crocker Science Center

South Biology Building

South Biology BUILDING


  • Completed: 1967
  • Architect: William F. Thomas

What is now called the South Biology building consolidated the several departments in what was then the Division of Biology that in the late 50s was spread over 16 different facilities. It was also the catalyst for a strong new Division emphasis in cellular and molecular microbiology, including the hiring of Mario Capecchi, the Nobel Laureate whose original lab was in the building.

The structure was first discussed as early as 1958 during the days of the University’s hosting of the controversial Institute of Environmental Biological Research in partnership with the U.S. Army’s nearby Dugway Proving Ground and the development of chemical, biological and radioactive weapons (CBR).

The building was delayed by the State Legislature’s refusal to appropriate the needed funds. It was only after substantial seed money from the National Institutes of Health, based on the Biology Division’s disease surveillance work at Dugway and other health-related duties being carried on that the state relented and ground was broken. (The Institute would “fade away” soon after.)

Today, South Biology houses mostly labs, including one of only two full anatomy (cadaver) labs on campus. Atop the building are greenhouses and in the basement, along with the anatomy lab, is a vivarium. Administration of what was re-named in 2018 the School of Biological Sciences is also housed in the building.

 

The Science Campus


South Physics Building

Thatcher Building

Fletcher Building

Skaggs Building

Eyring Building

Widtsoe Building

Cowles Building

Crocker Science Center

Thatcher Building

THOMAS THATCHER BUILDING


  • Completed: 1967
  • Named for: Thomas Thatcher, Donor
  • Architect: ??
  • Style: ??
  • Builders: ??

A crowd of well-wishers gathered on Wednesday, March 13, to celebrate the opening of the Thatcher Building for Biological and Biophysical Chemistry. The building is named in honor of the Lawrence E. and Helen F. Thatcher family, whose generous gift made the new facility possible. Located adjacent to the Henry Eyring Chemistry Building, the five-story structure provides space for much-needed research labs for graduate students—those future science professionals who are working in critical chemistry disciplines and will help shape the future of the Department of Chemistry.

The second level of the building will enhance the training of undergraduate students in the latest techniques and tools in chemistry research. It also houses the Curie Club, established in 2011, one hundred years after Marie Curie’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The club inspires and supports women in science, and provides space to host activities ranging from undergraduate experiments in the adjacent laboratories, to informal outreach to school children and scout groups.

The top floor of the building features a 100-seat seminar room and reception area with sweeping views of the Salt Lake Valley.

On the west side of the building is a stunning, four-story glass wall with a design of the periodic table etched in the glass—the large symbols are the first thing students, faculty, staff and visitors will see as they enter campus from the Stadium TRAX station and parking lot. The iconic “window” makes a strong statement that chemistry ranks high on this campus.

In addition to making the lead gift for the new building, the Thatcher Family endowed a Thatcher Company Scholarship last year, and in a surprise announcement at the dedication, President Pershing announced an additional gift from Lawrence, Helen and Tom Thatcher—a new Presidential Endowed Chair in Biological Chemistry. President Pershing was noticeably pleased to announce that the inaugural chair is a woman—Cynthia Burrows—a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Chemistry and recipient of a University of Utah Distinguished Teaching Award. Burrows will have laboratories located in the new building and will provide leadership for future generations of students and faculty in biological chemistry.

>> FYInews - March 15, 2013

 

The Science Campus


South Physics Building

South Biology Building

Fletcher Building

Skaggs Building

Eyring Building

Widtsoe Building

Cowles Building

Crocker Science Center

Fletcher Building

James Fletcher BUILDING


  • Completed: 1967
  • Named for: James C. Fletcher, President 1964-1971
  • Architect: ??
  • Style: ??
  • Materials: ??

The Widtsoe building was originally the Physical Science Building. In 1976, this building was remodeled to house the Mathematics Department. Dr. Widtsoe was the author of the laws and by-laws of the first University Constitution.

This building was nearly destroyed by fire on December 19, 1901. but was restored in 1902. In 1911 an addition was constructed on the north side. The interior was remodeled extensively in 1975. This building differs greatly from its companion, the Alfred C. Emery Building, with a non-monumental entrance placed asymmetrically on its facade.

 

The Science Campus


South Physics Building

South Biology Building

Thatcher Building

Skaggs Building

Eyring Building

Widtsoe Building

Cowles Building

Crocker Science Center

Skaggs Building

Aline W. Skaggs BUILDING


Located immediately east of the South Biology Building, the Aline W. Skaggs building was built on the site of the old gymnasium building, later known as the Dance Building. Also demolished for the construction was a small brick building that formerly housed the University seismograph and a small, wooden ex-Army building moved to the site following WWII.

Though designed primarily for research , the new building included two large lecture halls, the largest to seat 350 and where today Frontiers of Science, the University's longest running lecture series, is regularly staged. James Ehleringer was the department chair at the time and instrumental in overseeing the project.

One interesting historical note is that when the building was finished a stand-off developed between the University and the State Legislature concerning funds for operation and maintenance of the building, estimated at $680,000 annually. Though the Skaggs gift, along with a subsequent bond issue to be paid off from research funds, entirely funded the construction, the Legislature made no appropriation to operate it. The Legislature eventually agreed to pay for all but $200,000 of the annual bill.

 

The Science Campus


South Physics Building

South Biology Building

Thatcher Building

Fletcher Building

Eyring Building

Widtsoe Building

Cowles Building

Crocker Science Center

Eyring Building

Henry Eyring BUILDING


  • Completed: ??
  • Named for: ??
  • Architect: ??
  • Style: ??
  • Materials: ??

The Cowles building housed the original library of the University until 1913, when the collection was moved to the Park Building. The Liberal Arts Department then took the place of the library. In 1957 this building housed the Mathematics Department, and in 1976, it became the Communication Building.

Of the first three University of Utah buildings constructed, this one is the least altered, both inside and out. The entrance, on the west side, has two columns with unusual capitals, which support a portico in front of the double arched doorway. Like its companion, the James E. Talmage Building, the entrance is placed asymmetrically on the facade.

 

The Science Campus


South Physics Building

South Biology Building

Thatcher Building

Fletcher Building

Skaggs Building

Widtsoe Building

Cowles Building

Crocker Science Center

Widtsoe Building

JOHN A. WIDTSOE BUILDING


  • Completed: 1901
  • Named for: John A. Widtsoe, President 1916-1921
  • Architect: Richard K.A. Kletting
  • Style: Second Renaissance Revival
  • Materials: Brick and Sandstone

The Widtsoe building was originally the Physical Science Building. In 1976, this building was remodeled to house the Mathematics Department. Dr. Widtsoe was the author of the laws and by-laws of the first University Constitution.

This building was nearly destroyed by fire on December 19, 1901. but was restored in 1902. In 1911 an addition was constructed on the north side. The interior was remodeled extensively in 1975. This building differs greatly from its companion, the Alfred C. Emery Building, with a non-monumental entrance placed asymmetrically on its facade.

 

The Science Campus


South Physics Building

South Biology Building

Thatcher Building

Fletcher Building

Skaggs Building

Eyring Building

Cowles Building

Crocker Science Center

Cowles Building

LEROY E. COWLES BUILDING


  • Completed: 1901
  • Named for: Leroy E. Cowles, President 1941-46
  • Architect: Richard K.A. Kletting
  • Style: Second Renaissance Revival
  • Materials: Brick and Sandstone

The Cowles building housed the original library of the University until 1913, when the collection was moved to the Park Building. The Liberal Arts Department then took the place of the library. In 1957 this building housed the Mathematics Department, and in 1976, it became the Communication Building.

Of the first three University of Utah buildings constructed, this one is the least altered, both inside and out. The entrance, on the west side, has two columns with unusual capitals, which support a portico in front of the double arched doorway. Like its companion, the James E. Talmage Building, the entrance is placed asymmetrically on the facade.

 

The Science Campus


South Physics Building

South Biology Building

Thatcher Building

Fletcher Building

Skaggs Building

Eyring Building

Widtsoe Building

Crocker Science Center

Crocker Science Center

Crocker Science Center


The University of Utah dedicated its new Gary and Ann Crocker Science Center on Friday, launching a host of new facilities, classrooms and laboratories devoted to interdisciplinary science and math instruction.

Led by a $10 million donation from Gary and Ann Crocker, the U. has poured nearly $55 million in state and private funds into overhauling the 83-year-old George Thomas Building on its Salt Lake City campus’ Presidents Circle.

“This modern science hub is ready to serve new generations of students, faculty and staff at the University of Utah,” Henry S. White, dean of the College of Science, said in a written statement. “We are extremely grateful for Gary and Ann’s pioneering support for this building to become a world-class science education and research center on campus.”

School administrators—including new U. President Ruth Watkins—joined Utah Gov. Gary Herbert and other elected officials, faith leaders and other dignitaries Friday afternoon for a dedication ceremony and official opening of the research and education building.

In addition to a fully equipped, world-class biotechnology incubator, the newly renovated Crocker Science Center will house new classrooms, support areas and a host of research programs from the U.‘s College of Science.

It will also be home to the Henry Eyring Center for Cell and Genome Science and the U.’s Center for Science and Math Education. The renovated building is part of a flurry of demolitions, construction and upgrades at Utah’s flagship university in recent years.

Improvements at the U. are planned, underway or newly completed at several major sites, including Orson Spencer Hall, renovation of Cleone Peterson Eccles Alumni House, improved pedestrian accessibility between Rice Eccles Stadium and the S.J. Quinney College of Law, construction of the Shoreline Ridge Garage, and a series of campus-wide improvements to plumbing and other systems.

The Salt Lake Tribune - April 20, 2018

 

 

The Science Campus


Skaggs Building

Thatcher Building

Eyring Building

Widtsoe Building

South Biology Building

South Physics Building

Fletcher Building

Cowles Building