Pride Week

Pride Week 2021


The College of Science recognizes that scientific research benefits from diversity in the lab and in the classroom, and we are working to promote a culture of acceptance, equity, and inclusion in our college. This is ongoing work, and takes the dedication of all of us to strive to improve. The College of Science has developed a series of Zoom backgrounds highlighting LGBTQ+ scientists and mathematicians. We encourage you to use these during Pride Week and beyond. 

The University is planning numerous activities for Pride Week. We hope that students, faculty and staff are able to find ways to participate in these opportunities. 

There are hundreds more scientists than we can include here. The College of Science has an LGBTQ+ STEM Interest Group: https://theroglab.org/lgbtq. More stories and resources are available at the links below:

500 Queer Scientists

https://lgbtphysicists.org/

https://astro-outlist.github.io/

Zoom Backgrounds


Please download and use these zoom backgrounds highlighting LGBTQ+ scientists and mathematicians to use during Pride Week and the spring semester.

To add and use a Virtual Background in Zoom:

  • Right click and save the Virtual Background image.
  • Under Zoom - Preferences/Settings, choose Background and Filters.
  • Click the plus sign (+) to the right of Virtual Backgrounds to upload a new background image.
  • For further instructions, consult Zoom's Help Center.

MLK Week

mlk Week 2021


Historically, the Black, Indigeneous, and People of Color (BIPOC) community has been underrepresented in science and mathematics. The College of Science recognizes that scientific research benefits from diversity in the lab and in the classroom, and we are working to promote a culture of acceptance, equity, and inclusion in our college. This is ongoing work, and takes the dedication of all of us to strive to improve. This month, we are highlighting Black chemists, biologists, physicists, astronomers and mathematicians that have made extraordinary contributions to their field. 

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Week (MLK Week) has become a platform to engage students, faculty, staff and community members in critical conversations around contemporary Civil Rights issues and race in America. The University is planning numerous activities for MLK week. We hope that students, faculty and staff are able to find ways to participate in these opportunities. 

The College of Science has developed a series of Zoom backgrounds highlighting Black scientists and mathematicians. We encourage you to use these during MLK week and the upcoming semester. 

Zoom Backgrounds


Please download and use these zoom backgrounds highlighting Black scientists and mathematicians to use during MLK week and the upcoming spring semester.

To add and use a Virtual Background in Zoom:

  • Right click and save the Virtual Background image.
  • Under Zoom - Preferences/Settings, choose Background and Filters.
  • Click the plus sign (+) to the right of Virtual Backgrounds to upload a new background image.
  • For further instructions, consult Zoom's Help Center.

Alice Ball

Dr. Alice Augusta Ball (July 24, 1892 – December 31, 1916) was an American chemist who developed the "Ball Method", the most effective treatment for leprosy during the early 20th century. She was the first woman and first African American to receive a master's degree from the University of Hawaii, and was also the university's first female and African American chemistry professor.

Edray H. Goins

Dr. Goins is a Professor of Mathematics at Pomona College. He specializes in number theory and algebraic geometry, and his interests include Selmer groups for elliptic curves using class groups of number fields, Belyi maps and Dessin d'enfants. He grew up in Los Angeles, obtained a Ph.D. from Stanford (1999) and he was previously at Purdue University. He was the president of the National Association of Mathematicians (NAM) which seeks to promote the success of underrepresented minorities in the mathematical sciences. He spends most of his summers engaging underrepresented students in research.

Renee Horton

Dr. K. Renee Horton is a native of Baton Rouge, Louisiana and lifelong lover of science and NASA. A graduate of Louisiana State University with a B.S. of Electrical Engineering with a minor in Math in 2002 and a Ph.D. in Material Science with a concentration in Physics, becoming the first African American to graduate from the University of Alabama in 2011 in this area. Dr. Horton currently serves as the Space Launch System (SLS) Quality Engineer in the NASA Residential Management Office at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans. In 2016, Dr. Horton was elected President of the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP) as the second woman to hold the office, and In 2017, she was elevated to a Fellow in the NSBP, which is the highest honor bestowed upon a member.

Robert Henry Lawrence Jr.

Dr. Robert Henry Lawrence Jr. was a chemist by training, and was also the first African American astronaut. Lawrence was born in Chicago in 1935. After graduating from Bradley University with a chemistry degree, he joined the United States Air Force, eventually becoming a test pilot.

Soon after, the Air Force selected him to become an astronaut to work on low-orbit intelligence missions. This program was the precursor to the NASA’s space shuttle program. During his training, Lawrence also got a PhD in physical chemistry from the Ohio State University.

Lawrence never made it into space. In 1967, he died during a training flight at Edwards Air Force Base. He had completed about 2,500 hours of flight time in his short career. Bradley University named a scholarship in Lawrence’s honor, and a school in Chicago was also named for him. On Feb. 14, 2020, a shuttle bearing Lawrence’s name embarked for the International Space Station, carrying, among other things, supplies for scientific research.

Brandon Ogbunu

Dr. Ogbunu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and leader of the Genetics, Ecology, Evolution, and Quantitative Science (GEEQS) Lab at Yale University. His research takes place at the intersection of evolutionary biology, genetics, and epidemiology. He uses experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and computational biology to better understand the underlying causes and consequences of disease, across scales: from the biophysics of proteins involved in drug resistance to the social determinants driving epidemics at the population level. In doing so, he aims to develop theory that enriches our understanding of the evolutionary and ecological underpinnings of disease, while contributing to practical solutions for clinical medicine and public health. 

Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein is an Assistant Professor of Physics and Core Faculty Member in Women’s Studies at the University of New Hampshire. In addition, she is a monthly columnist at New Scientist and a contributing columnist at Physics World. Her work lives at the intersection of particle physics and astrophysics, and while she is primarily a theoretical researcher, maintains strong ties to astronomy.  Dr. Prescod-Weinstein is a topical convenor for Dark Matter: Cosmic Probes in the Snowmass 2021 process, and a lead axion wrangler for the NASA STROBE-X Probe Concept Study. Using ideas from both physics and astronomy, she responds to deep questions about how everything in the universe got to be the way it is. In addition, she researches feminist science studies, and believes all have the right to know the universe.

Candice R. Price

Dr. Price is an Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Statistics at Smith College. Her primary area of mathematical research is DNA topology, that is, knot theory applied to the structure of DNA, but she has research interests in the broad area of applied mathematics. She is a co-founder of the Underrepresented Students in Topology and Algebra Research Symposium (USTARS) and co-creator of the website mathematicallygiftedandblack.com that features profiles of Black mathematicians. Her service mission is to support those underrepresented in STEM by creating and supporting programs that increase visibility and amplify the voices of women and people of color in STEM while creating networks and community in STEM to provide opportunities to share resources. 

Clifton Sanders

Clifton G. Sanders, Ph.D., is the Provost for Academic Affairs at Salt Lake Community College. A chemist by training, he has more than 25 years teaching, administrative and leadership experience in higher education. He has held several administrative posts at SLCC, including Division Chair for Natural Sciences, Dean of Science, Mathematics and Engineering, and Interim Vice President for Workforce and Literacy. Dr. Sanders led the development of several STEM programs and has provided leadership for several local and national initiatives in STEM education and workforce development, including major grants sponsored by the Department of Labor and the Department of Energy, and collaborative projects with the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) and Utah MESA/STEP. Prior to joining SLCC, Dr. Sanders was a senior research scientist and has several patents in biomaterials technology. His research was sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense.


Scholarships, Grants & Financial Aid

College of Science Scholarship Opportunities


The College of Science offers a number of scholarship opportunities for incoming, undergraduate and graduate students. Scholarship applications may be found through Academic Works, the University's scholarship application portal. Complete the University General Application then you will see the Science scholarship opportunities.

It is highly recommended that all students fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each year to determine what state or federal aid for which you may be eligible, including work-study opportunities and grants.

First-year and transfer students must have an active Campus Information Services (CIS) account and University E-mail account (UMail) before applying for scholarships.

Career Exploration scholarship


COS undergraduates participating in internships or career-building opportunities are eligible to receive the Career Exploration Scholarship. Preference is given to students who:

  • Are participating in an unpaid or low-paid internship
  • Have financial need
  • Are earning credit for the internship

If you have questions about this opportunity or the application, please email jacqueline.broida@utah.edu.

 

Incoming Student Opportunities


College of Science Scholarships are now closed.

Applications for the 2022-23 academic year will open in January 2022.

  • Multiple awards for incoming freshman and transfer students
  • Upper division 3 course credits satisfies both International Requirement (IR) and Science Foundation (SF)
  • Research laboratory position during their first year the U
  • Summer housing opportunity at the Marriott Honors Community (freshman only)
  • For more information, visit the ACCESS page

  • Multiple $1,000 awards for incoming freshman who declare a major in the College of Science: Applied Mathematics, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics
  • One multi-year award will be made to current or incoming freshman who declare a major in the College of Science: Applied Mathematics, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics
  • Preference given to Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics majors
  • Minimum GPA of 3.5
  • Award covers in-state tuition up to 15 credit hours per semester
  • The Science Research Initiative offers incoming and transfer students an opportunity to practice discovery based research and tackle cutting edge problems in dedicated science streams
  • Preference given to College of Science declared majors: Applied Mathematics, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics

  • One multi-year award will be made to current or incoming freshman who declares a major in the College of Science: Applied Mathematics, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics who has financial need
  • Minimum GPA of 3.00
  • Preference given to Mathematics majors and applicants from single-parent homes
  • Award covers in-state tuition up to 15 credit hours per semester for eight semesters

Current Student Opportunities


College of Science Scholarships are now closed.

Applications for the 2022-23 academic year will open in January 2022.

  • Multiple $4,000 awards will be made to juniors and seniors with expected graduation date in 2022 or 2023
  • Minimum GPA of 3.70
  • Twelve undergraduates will be honored with the title of Crocker Science House Scholar
  • Each resident receives a $1,000 award to assist with rent and meal plan
  • Students share a quiet, study-oriented residence on Officers Circle, Fort Douglas
  • Residents must contract with Housing & Residential Education for their room reservation and meal plan
  • One award of $2,000 will be made to a junior, senior, or graduate student who is committed to teaching science and/or math in the secondary school system in the state of Utah who have financial need
  • Must be a declared College of Science Teaching major or enrolled in the College of Science M.S. Degree Program for Secondary School Teachers (MSSST)
  • Applicants must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the priority deadline of February 1
  • One multi-year award will be made to current or incoming freshman who declare a major in the College of Science: Applied Mathematics, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics
  • Minimum GPA of 3.5
  • Preference given to Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics majors
  • Award covers in-state tuition up to 15 credit hours per semester
  • Multiple $2,000 awards will be made to juniors, seniors, and graduate students
  • Minimum GPA of 3.00
  • Applicants must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the priority deadline of February 1
  • One $1,000 award will be made to current or incoming freshman who declare a major in the College of Science: Applied Mathematics, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics
  • Minimum GPA of 3.00
  • Preference given to Chemistry majors and/or first generation college student
  • One award will be made to a student who has more than 30 University of Utah credit hours
  • Must be a Non-Resident of Utah and a U.S. Citizen
  • Minimum GPA of 3.30

Questions

Questions about scholarships and financial aid? Make an appointment with a financial aid counselor!

If you have questions about a specific College of Science opportunity, please email office@science.utah.edu.

Departmental Scholarship Opportunities


Emergency Funding


The University of Utah has limited emergency funding for students impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. If you are in need of emergency funding, please apply below.

EDGES Graduate Fellowship

 E.D.G.E.S


Enhancing Diversity and Graduate Student Educational Success

The EDGES program in the College of Science seeks to increase success for graduate students in STEM fields, to enrich the academic environment for the campus community and to broaden the STEM workforce.

This program provides funds (up to $10,000 per student) to recruit, retain, and promote the success of outstanding doctoral students who have the potential to contribute to the diversity of their academic fields and departments. Awards can be spent any time for up to five years after acceptance, or until the student graduates, whichever comes first.

Fellowship Application Process

All students accepted to a department's graduate program will be invited to apply to this program, and priority for awards will be given to admitted students seeking Ph.D. training.

The application includes two parts - one from the graduate admissions committee, and an accompanying part from the student. Application packages can be sent in any time following acceptance, with a final deadline of March 28, 2022.

Graduate Student portion of application:
Admitted students who wish to apply will submit a statement (500 words or fewer) that describes their potential to enhance diversity, broadly interpreted. Examples include: describing experiences as a member of an underrepresented group or a first-generation college student; or describing a record of sustained commitment to enhancing diversity in science.

Graduate Admissions Committee portion of application: a single pdf containing the following two items:

  • The admitted student's complete graduate school application packet
  • A statement from the department's graduate admission chair confirming that the student has been admitted to the graduate program, and specifying if the applicant seeks a Ph.D. or a M.S.
Submit application packages (as a pdf file) to lindsey@science.utah.edu

 

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Community Organizations

BUILDING COMMUNITY


Scientific discovery is a result of collaboration and support.

You have a place in the College of Science. There are several organizations where students can find community, peer support, and resources. Please contact us if you would like your organization listed on this page.

 

American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES)

In order to increase the numbers of Indigenous North Americans seeking degrees and careers in STEM fields, students must be started on the STEM pathway early. AISES administers many programs, services, and events for pre-college, undergraduate and graduate students designed to increase their access to college and support their success in preparation for careers in STEM fields.

American Chemical Society (ACS)

The University of Utah's ACS Student Chapter is an organization dedicated to encouraging future generations of students to take an interest in chemistry and science.

University of Utah students present exciting chemistry demonstrations to elementary, middle, and high schools throughout the Salt Lake area, as well as provide tutoring services that focus primarily on math and science.

Association for Women in Mathematics

Our goals are to: support, build a community for, mentor, increase interest in mathematics from, encourage, and introduce role models to underrepresented groups in mathematics.

Curie Club

Curie Club is made up of individuals committed to the advancement of science and to creating opportunities for all identities to make an even greater contribution to medicine, scientific research, environmental solutions and entrepreneurial innovation.

Young scientists represent the future for breakthroughs in medicine, environment, new materials, and other discoveries critical to addressing our greatest global challenges. Curie Club was founded to help ensure that all individual scientists are given the opportunity to help shape that future. We welcome, support, and celebrate all identities.

Latino Medical Student Association (LMSA)

Latino Medical Student Association (LMSA) Chapter at the University of Utah School of Medicine. LMSA unites and empowers medical students through service, mentorship, and education to advocate for the health of the Latino community.

oSTEM

This group is an association of students at the University of Utah who are interested in STEM fields as well as part of the LGBT community.

Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS)

SACNAS is an all-inclusive community dedicated to supporting diversity and inclusion in STEM fields and fostering the success of scientists from under-represented backgrounds. Our goal is to help these members attain advanced degrees, careers, and positions of leadership in STEM. Come be a part of the vibrant SACNAS community at the University of Utah and help us cultivate a safe and secure scientific community filled with the brightest scientists. We aim to provide a holistic approach to STEM training by organizing opportunities for professional development, cultural programming, resilience training, and a pipeline of support and mentoring within a national network. Be the best U with the University of Utah SACNAS chapter.

Society of Physics Students (SPS)

The Society of Physics Students is a national organization dedicated to promoting an interest in science and physics. We are the local chapter, and you do not need to be a physics major to get involved! All you need to get involved is have an interest in physics!

Undergrad Women in Physics & Astronomy (UWomPA)

We are a community of physics undergraduates at the University of Utah. We strive for equality, community, friendship, and the fervent pursuit of science.

Physics Undergraduate Student Advisory Committee (USAC)

Our Undergraduate Student Advisory Committee (USAC) advises the Department of Physics & Astronomy in matters concerning their undergraduate students. We do this primarily through our participation in the RPT (Retention, Promotion, and Tenure) process for the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

In addition, we occasionally participate in other activities promoting student involvement within the Department. Overall, USAC is an amazing way to be a voice for your fellow Undergraduate students in matters concerning the Department of Physics and Astronomy.