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Frontiers of Science

Frontiers of Science


The 2020-2021 Frontiers of Science lectures are online only. Registration will be through the Alumni Association.

The Frontiers of Science lecture series was established in 1967 by University of Utah alumnus and Physics Professor Peter Gibbs. By 1970, the University had hosted 10 Nobel laureates for public Frontiers lectures. By 1993, when Gibbs retired, the Frontiers organizers had hosted another 20 laureates. Today, Frontiers of Science is the longest continuously-running lecture series at the University of Utah.


Thursday, October 22, 12-1 pm
Nature is the Future of Chemistry.

Shelley Minteer - Associate Chair of Chemistry Dept, University of Utah
Henry White - Distinguished Professor, Chemistry Dept, University of Utah
Scott Anderson - Distinguished Professor, Chemistry Dept, University of Utah

>> Watch the Video <<

The Center for Synthetic Organic Electrochemistry (CSOE) was recently awarded $20 million to advance its work to make synthetic organic electrochemistry mainstream. Join Peter Trapa, Dean of the College of Science, as he speaks with Dr. Shelley Minteer and her team on demystifying this process, and how its use will enable new green, safe, and economically beneficial new discoveries.

Dr. Shelley Minteer, professor of Analytical, biological & materials chemistry at the University of Utah, uses nature as an inspiration and solution to chemistry problems. Her group focuses on improving the abiotic-biotic interface between biocatalysts and electrode surfaces for enhanced bioelectrocatalysis and designs electrode structures for enhanced flux at electrode surfaces for biosensor and biofuel cell applications. In addition to holding the Dale and Susan Poulter Chair in Biological Chemistry, Dr. Minteer is the Director of the U’s Center for Synthetic Organic Electrochemistry which was just awarded a $20 Million NSF grant for the center’s Phase II development.

Thursday, November 19, 12-1 pm
The Future of Western Forests in a Changing Climate.

Bill Anderegg - Assistant Professor, School of Biological Sciences

>> Watch the Video <<

Climate change may dramatically reshape western landscapes and forests through heat, drought, fires, and beetles. What can science tell us about what the future looks like for western US forests and what we can do about it?

Assistant Professor in the School of Biological Sciences at the U, Dr. William “Bill” Anderegg’s research centers on the intersection of ecosystems and climate change. In particular, he strives to understand the future of the Earth’s forests in a changing climate. Massive mortality events of many tree species in the last decade prompt concerns that drought, insects, and wildfire may devastate forests in the coming decades. Widely published, most recently in Science and PNAS, Anderegg studies how drought and climate change affect forest ecosystems, including tree physiology, species interactions, carbon cycling, and biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks. His work spans a broad array of spatial scales from xylem cells to ecosystems and seeks to gain a better mechanistic understanding of how climate change will affect forests around the world. Dr. Anderegg received his bachelor's and Ph.D. from Stanford University and did an NOAA Climate & Global change post-doctoral fellowship at Princeton.

Thursday, February 18, 12-1 pm
On Thinning Ice - Modeling sea ice in a warming climate.

Ken Golden - Department of Mathematics

>> Registration link coming soon <<

Precipitous declines of sea ice are writing a new narrative for the polar marine environment. Earth’s sea ice covers can tell us a lot about climate change—they are canaries in the coal mine. Predicting what may happen to sea ice and the ecosystems it supports over the next ten, fifty, or one hundred years requires extensive mathematical modeling of key physical and biological processes, and the role that sea ice plays in global climate. Ken Golden, Distinguished Professor of Mathematics, will discuss his research, his Arctic and Antarctic adventures, and how mathematics is currently playing an important role in addressing these fundamental issues and will likely play an even greater role in the future.

Ken Golden is a Distinguished Professor of Mathematics and an Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Utah. His research is focused on developing mathematical models of sea ice which are inspired by theories of composite materials and statistical physics. He has traveled 18 times to the Arctic and Antarctic, and his work has been published in a wide range of scientific journals. Golden is a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, an Inaugural Fellow of the American Mathematical Society, and a Fellow of the Explorers Club, whose members have included Neil Armstrong, Sir Edmund Hillary, Robert Peary, and Jane Goodall.

Thursday, March 18, 12-1 pm
The Center of the Galaxy

Anil Seth - Department of Physics & Astronomy

>> Registration link coming soon <<

Dr. Anil Seth, associate professor of Physics & Astronomy at the U, studies the formation and evolution of nearby galaxies by detecting individual stars and clusters of stars whose ages, composition, and motions can be measured. His research focuses on understanding the centers of galaxies and the black holes and massive star clusters found there. He also studies the large surveys of our nearest spiral neighbors, Andromeda and Triangulum, and is involved with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s APOGEE project. He was named a Presidential Scholar by the U and has been awarded several National Science Foundation grants.

All lectures are subject to change. Contact events@science.utah.edu for questions or more information.

VIDEO ARCHIVE


History


A Lecture Series Spanning Five Decades

The Frontiers of Science lecture series was established in 1967 by University of Utah alumnus and Physics Professor Peter Gibbs. Gibbs and his fellow physics faculty at the U sought to bring notable researchers from around the country to the University to discuss the current “frontiers” in physics research. The larger goal was to present public lectures that would attract attention to important developments in scientific research.

By 1970, the University had hosted 10 Nobel laureates for public Frontiers lectures. By 1993, when Gibbs retired, the Frontiers organizers had hosted another 20 laureates. Today, Frontiers of Science is the longest continuously-running lecture series at the University of Utah.

The first Frontiers event was presented by Peter Gibbs himself, who discussed “Einstein the Sociologist,” on April 1, 1967. Physics Professors David C. Evans, Grant R. Fowles and Jack W. Keuffel presented the remaining three lectures that year. In the meantime, the group worked on scheduling outstanding speakers for the following year.

Gibbs and colleagues made good on their promise to bring exceptional scientists to campus. During the 1968-69 academic year, eight lectures were held, including ones by C.N. Yang from the University of New York at Stony Brook (“Symmetry Principles in Physics”) and Murray Gell-Mann from the California Institute of Technology (“Elementary Particles”). Nobel laureates gave three of the eight presentations that academic year, and during 1969 as a whole, six of thirteen lectures were given by Nobel laureates. Topics included astronomy, mathematics, anthropology, politics and social issues.

Gibbs and the early FOS organizers were extremely adept at recruiting famous and soon-to-be-famous scientists. They also were keenly aware of the state of scientific research and the social climate of the time. President Nixon was in office, the Vietnam War was escalating and student protests were common on university campuses including the U of U. The United States had just put a man on the moon. Personal computers did not exist.

Through the 1970s as many as ten lectures were presented each academic year, but by 1980 the pace had slowed to a more manageable five or six per year. The FOS series had become immensely popular and the topics were broadened to include biology, chemistry, mathematics and the earth sciences.

In the early 1980s, FOS audiences were treated to firsthand accounts of the discovery of the structure of DNA by James D. Watson (“The Double Helix and Destiny,” 1981) and Francis H.C. Crick (“The Two DNA Revolutions,” 1984), the achievement for which they had received a Nobel Prize in 1962.

Many FOS speakers were not so famous or honored when they spoke here, but became so later in their career. For example, F. Sherwood Rowland spoke on “Man’s Threat to Stratospheric Ozone” in the 1978 academic year, and was a co-recipient of the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his pioneering studies on the destruction of ozone by chlorofluro- carbons which was his topic in 1978!

From 1994 to 1997, the Frontiers of Science series was complemented by the Davern/Gardner Laureateship. Dean T. Benny Rushing, Biology Professor K. Gordon Lark, and Emeritus Professor Boyer Jarvis wished to honor the memory of two former College of Science faculty members who made extraordinary administrative contributions to the University of Utah: Cedric “Ric” Davern and Pete D. Gardner.

Rushing, Lark and Jarvis secured a generous grant from the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation to fund the Davern/Gardner Laureateship. The Laureateship allowed the College to bring a notable scientist to campus to deliver a public lecture and to interact with research teams and faculty that shared the invitee’s scientific interests. Dr. John Cairns gave the first lecture in November 1994. A total of six Davern/Gardner Laureateship lectures were presented until the grant was exhausted.

The history of venues for Frontiers of Science presentations is quite colorful. From 1967 to 1970, various rooms were used, including 103 North Physics, 200 Music Hall and Mark Greene Hall in the College of Business. By 1974, FOS events were often held in the Waldemer P. Read auditorium in Orson Spencer Hall. The Read auditorium featured stadium seating for about 400 people and was primarily used through the 1980s.

By 1990, the Fine Arts auditorium became the venue of choice because it was newer, larger, and had a better sound system. However, the lighting and sound controls were problematic and scheduling conflicts forced organizers to utilize the nearby Social Work auditorium on occasion.

In the meantime, the College of Science was constructing the Aline Wilmot Skaggs Biology Research Building (ASB) that included a beautiful 325-seat lecture auditorium and an adjoining 125-seat room complete with modern sound systems, digital video projectors and lighting. When ASB opened in 1997, the Frontiers series finally had a home within the College.

In 2003, the College of Mines and Earth Sciences joined with the College of Science to co-host FOS and increase the number of lectures devoted to aspects of geology, geophysics and meteorology. The effort was successful and a total of five presentations were scheduled, including Paul F. Hoffman, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, Harvard University (“Snowball Earth: Testing the Limits of Global Climate Change,” 2003) and Peter B. deMenocal, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University (“Climate Shifts and the Collapse of Ancient Cultures,” 2004).

In March 2007, Professor Kerry A. Emanuel of MIT discussed the history and science of hurricanes, including how climate change may be influencing storm cycles around the world. He used stunning photos and graphics to explain how hurricanes work, what determines their energy and destructiveness, and the economic and social implications of our policies for dealing with the risks they pose.

In 2008, The 14th Astronomer Royal of Great Britain, Sir Arnold Wolfendale, graced Utah audiences with a superb presentation on “Time: From Harrison’s Clocks to the Possibility of New Physics.” Other international guests were Dr. Jennifer Graves, Distinguished Professor at La Trobe University, Australia, and Dr. Stefan Hell, Nobel laureate and Director of the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen, Germany.

Peter Gibbs: The Father of “Frontiers”

Physics Professor Pete Gibbs and his colleagues established the Frontiers of Science lecture series as a method to bring notable researchers from around the world to Utah to discuss the current “frontiers” in scientific research. The first Frontiers event was presented by Pete Gibbs himself, on April 1, 1967. During the following two years, nine of the twenty-one FoS lectures were given by current or future Nobel laureates.

The early success of Frontiers was largely due to Pete’s personal invitations, and also his family’s skill at hosting prominent scientists in their home near the University campus. The Gibbs family offered lodging, food, and world-class skiing, to sweeten the deal.

Pete Gibbs passed away on July 13, 2019 surrounded by family and friends. He was 94.

Frontiers of Science, now in its 52nd year, continues to be sponsored by the College of Science and the College of Mines and Earth Sciences. The list of speakers now includes some 280 distinguished scientists.

  


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October Update

 

October Update


October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

The College of Science supports the U's efforts to make our campus community safer for all. The Center for Student Wellness has numerous opportunities for students to learn more about preventing and helping those affected by interpersonal violence.

Goldwater Scholarship

The Goldwater Foundation awards $7,500 scholarships to outstanding undergraduate students. The University of Utah internal deadline to apply is November 23, 2020.

Frontiers of Science

Nature is the Future of Chemistry - Dean Peter Trapa speaks with Dr. Shelley Minteer and the team at the Center for Synthetic Organic Electrochemistry. The group was recently awarded $20 million to make synthetic organic electrochemistry mainstream–demystifying the process, and demonstrating how it enables green, safe, and economically beneficial discoveries.  Watch the video.

Graduating this Spring?

Are you planning to graduate this spring? Make an appointment with your academic advisor before registering for spring semester to make sure you are on track. We encourage you to apply for graduation early using the “Graduation” tile in CIS.

 

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$602 Million in Funding

Research Funding Tops $600 Million


Two years after achieving a $500 million funding milestone and with the added boost of funding for research related to the COVID-19 pandemic, the University of Utah reports $603 million in research funding for fiscal year 2020, which ended June 30.

“We would like to express our appreciation to our donors, investors, government officials and research partners,” said Vice President for Research Andy Weyrich. “Their support drives critical research projects in medicine, technology, mental health, economic growth, social injustice, racial disparities and much more.”

The milestone comes in a fiscal year that saw the U invited to join the prestigious Association of American Universities, a group of 65 top-tier research universities in the U.S. and Canada. The U, along with Dartmouth College and the University of California, Santa Cruz, joined the AAU in 2019 as peers with the top universities in the nation.

The research funding milestone also comes amid a global pandemic and a proliferation of research related to the medical, economic and social aspects of COVID-19. Following seed grants totaling $1.3 million, funded by the Office of the Vice President for Research in partnership with the Immunology, Inflammation and Infectious Disease (3i) Initiative, U researchers in various disciplines secured additional external funding, which contributed to passing the $600 million mark.

“Our researchers are at the forefront of addressing the impact COVID-19 has on our society,” Weyrich said. “We’ve been awarded a significant number of research grants across multiple disciplines to support COVID research, including the social, psychological and economic impacts the virus has on our global community.”

 - First Published in @theU

 

 

Notebook 2020

Notebook 2020


Donor Recognition

Thank you for your support of our vibrant community of scientists and mathematicians.

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Student Emergency Fund

Support students in need.

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Rapid Response Research

Behind-the-scenes story of an NSF Rapid Response Research grant.

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Dean’s Update

Updated: June 12, 2020.

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Dominique Pablito

Zuni, Navajo and Comanche, student majoring in chemistry and biology.

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2020 Convocation

College of Science 2020 Convocation videos and slideshow.

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2020 Churchill Scholar

Michael Xiao brings home the U's fifth straight Churchill Scholarship.

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2020 Research Scholar

Delaney Mosier receives top College of Science award.

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Goldwater Winner

Isaac Martin awarded prestigious Goldwater Scholarship.

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50th Anniversary

Science has been part of the University of Utah since the very beginning.

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Goldwater Winner

Lydia Fries awarded prestigious Goldwater Scholarship.

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Ana Rosas

Medicine is a family tradition for the Rosas.

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Alex Acuna

Bridging the knowledge gap with networks of people.

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Dalley Cutler

I want to see sensible climate policies and actions.

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Debate 2020

Election 2020


On October 7, the University of Utah is hosting the 2020 Vice Presidential Debate.

"Civic engagement is a core value of our nation and, as we host the 2020 Vice Presidential debate, Utah students will be able to learn about the political process and experience firsthand how being involved matters." —Ruth V. Watkins, President of the University of Utah

 

Let your voice be heard. VOTE!

Voting may not seem important to science majors and faculty, but participation is incredibly important. A voice for science in federal, state, and local politics provides a crucial point of view for our world. Much of the funding decisions that support scientific research and discovery occurs on the federal level, so what happens in Washington, D.C. impacts our College of Science community.

STEM students least likely to vote.

A Tufts University survey of university students across the US reports that STEM students are the least likely of any subject group to vote. In 2016, the humanities turnout was 53%. The STEM turnout was 43%. The Union of Concerned Scientists provides students with voter registration information and trains scientists for involvement in policy and advocacy.

 

The Condorcet Paradox

Looking for a scientific perspective on our electoral process? Learn how mathematical analysis makes a difference in the political process through this video of Professor Tom Alberts explaining the Condorcet Paradox.

 

OurDNA Spring ’20

Spring 2020


Ana Rosas

Medicine is a family tradition for the Rosas.

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Karl Gordon Lark

Honoring Karl Gordon Lark, 1930-2020.

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Courtship Condos

Why is Dean Castillo managing the sexual relations of fruit flies?

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Alex Acuna

Bridging the knowledge gap with networks of people.

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Forest Futures

William Anderegg explains the risks of investing in forests.

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Student Visas

International Students


F1 Visa Update

July 14, 2020 - Update for International Students

Proposed changes in visa restrictions for international students have been rescinded, and visa qualifications will return to the standard set in the spring of 2020. International students are now able to register for classes that best suit their pathway to a degree, regardless of whether the class will be held online or in-person.

The College of Science remains committed to supporting you and helping you reach your academic goals and maintain your visa status under the current Immigration guidelines. The University of Utah continues to monitor this situation and will provide ongoing updates as new information becomes available.

I encourage you to reach out to your academic advisors or, in the case of graduate students, your department’s graduate program coordinator, with any questions or concerns that you may have.

We value the strength and diversity of our international student community, and we will continue to do whatever possible to support you during your academic career in the College of Science.

Sincerely,

 

 

 

Peter Trapa


Giant Poisonous Rats

The secret social lives of giant poisonous rats.

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Beckman Scholar

Sonia Sehgal awarded prestigious Beckman Scholarship.

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Frontiers of Science

The longest running lecture series at the University of Utah.

Read More
Next-Gen Astronomy

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is providing groundbreaking insight.

Read More
October Update

The magazine for the students, faculty, alumni and friends of the College of Science.

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$602 Million in Funding

Research funding passes $602 million for 2020.

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Notebook 2020

The magazine for the students, faculty, alumni and friends of the College of Science.

Read More
Debate 2020

STEM students least likely of any subject group to vote in U.S. elections.

Read More
Donor Recognition

Thank you for your support of our vibrant community of scientists and mathematicians.

Read More
OurDNA Spring ’20

The Fall 2019 Issue of OurDNA Magazine.

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Jordan Herman, PhD’20

Next time you’re stuck between an intimidating toucan and a camouflaged pit viper ...

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Presidential Scholar

Pearl Sandick has been named a University of Utah Presidential Scholar.

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Rapid Response Research

Behind-the-scenes story of an NSF Rapid Response Research grant.

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A.A.U. Membership

Utah joins the prestigious Association of American Universities.

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College Rankings

U.S. News & World Report University Rankings.

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11 Billion Years

Kyle Dawson and a global consortium of astrophysicists create a 3-D map of the universe.

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Back to School

The College of Science reopening plan for fall 2020.

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HIV Microscopy

Ipsita Saha is using electron microscopy to reveal the dynamic structure in HIV.

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Masks for U

Spread the word, not the virus.

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Forest Futures

William Anderegg explains the risks of investing in forests.

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Recent Awards

We're going to need a bigger trophy room.

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Dean’s Update

Updated: June 12, 2020.

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Crab Nebula

Scientists detect Crab Nebula using innovative gamma-ray telescope.

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We Stand…

For a compassionate, equitable, and just society for all.

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Student Info

Guidelines for the Summer 2020 semester.

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Dominique Pablito

Zuni, Navajo and Comanche, student majoring in chemistry and biology.

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OurDNA Fall 19′

The 2019 Issue of Notebook Magazine.

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2020 Convocation

College of Science 2020 Convocation videos and slideshow.

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2020 Churchill Scholar

Michael Xiao brings home the U's fifth straight Churchill Scholarship.

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Karl Gordon Lark

Honoring Karl Gordon Lark, 1930-2020.

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2020 Research Scholar

Delaney Mosier receives top College of Science award.

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Students & COVID-19

Info and resources for students, including financial assistance.

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Goldwater Winner

Isaac Martin awarded prestigious Goldwater Scholarship.

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Science Podcasts

Podcast from the College of Science.

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Courtship Condos

Why is Dean Castillo managing the sexual relations of fruit flies?

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Goldwater Winner

Lydia Fries awarded prestigious Goldwater Scholarship.

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Ana Rosas

Medicine is a family tradition for the Rosas.

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Dean’s Update

The latest information for science students, faculty and staff. Updated: March 24, 2020.

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Coronavirus Research

Physicists receive NSF grant to test coronavirus particles.

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Essential Research

Essential Research Activities and the process to become essential.

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Science VS Virus

Utah scientists address the Coronavirus pandemic.

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Crocker Science Center

New era begins at the U, with the newly renovated Gary and Ann Crocker Science Center.

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Discover 2019

The 2019 Research Report for the College of Science.

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Running with Scissors

In gene-targeting, CRISPR makes a really good pair of "scissors".

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Electrochemistry

Henry S. White - A positive force in Electrochemistry.

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Commutative Algebra

Can commutative algebra help us solve real-world problems?

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Alumni Panel

Distinguished science alumni share their experiences.

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TreeTop Barbie

Nalini Nadkarni has created a "Canopy Researcher" version of the popular Barbie doll.

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Research Funding

Research funding passes $540 million for 2019.

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Fellow of the A.M.S.

Davar Khoshnevisan, named Fellow of American Mathematical Society.

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Math in Paris

I needed to take a math class, so I searched "learning abroad differential equations"

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Going with the Flow

John Sperry studies how plant hydraulics and xylem tissue influence regional weather.

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Staff: Jose Rojas

Jose Rojas probably knows more about how labs operate than most principal investigators.

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Staff: James Muller

Building better science buildings.

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Dean Peter Trapa

Peter Trapa has been named as the new Dean of the College of Science.

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Notebook 2019

The 2019 Issue of Notebook Magazine.

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Quaid Harding

From beekeeping to biology, Quaid Harding is looking for a buzz.

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Zhao Scholarship

Taylor is the first recipient of the Michael Zhao Memorial Scholarship. She’s […]

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Royal Fellow

Christopher Hacon adds another honor of a lifetime to his already stellar resume.

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Rachel Cantrell

2019 Goldwater Recipient A 2019 Goldwater Scholarship has been awarded to Rachel […]

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Leslie Sieburth: Associate Dean

The College of Science is pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Leslie […]

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Pearl Sandick: Associate Dean

The College of Science is pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Pearl […]

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Janis Louie: Associate Dean

The College of Science is pleased to announce the appointment of Professor […]

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New Physics

Pearl Sandick discusses Dark Matter and challenging the Standard Model.

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Teaching Excellence

Kelly MacArthur is recognized for her extraordinary dedication to her students.

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Staff: Mary Levine

An indispensable part of the Department of Mathematics.

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Teaching Excellence

Recognizing extraordinary skill in university teaching.

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Distinguished Research

Professor Molinero’s work is a hallmark of what research and scholarship should be about.

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Distinguished Teaching

Gernot Laicher, Professor/Lecturer in the Department of Physics & Astronomy.

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2019 Research Scholar

The College of Science Research Scholar Award is given annually to one […]

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2019 Hatch Prize

Professor Joel Harris has been awarded the 2019 Hatch Prize for outstanding teaching!

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Associate V.P. for Research

Diane Pataki is now Associate Vice President for Research at the University of Utah.

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2019 Churchill Scholar

Cameron Owen - Chemistry and physics major and student researcher.

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Insects, Bacteria & Ice

Water doesn’t always freeze at 32 degrees and other chilling facts from Valeria Molinero.

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Discover 2018

The 2018 Research Report for the College of Science.

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Student Veteran

2018-19 Student Veteran of the Year, Craig L. Hanson  “When I first […]

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AMS Fellow

Tommaso de Fernex, Ph.D. Associate Department Chair of Mathematics.

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AMS Fellow

“I was delighted to learn the news from the AMS,” said Peter Trapa.

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Plant Genomics

QUESTION: How does RNA decay contribute to gene expression?

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Breakthrough Prize

Christopher Hacon, has been interested in math for as long as he can remember.

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2018 Churchill Scholar

Scott Neville - Mathematics major and student researcher.

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Beckman Alumnae

Ming Hammond recounts her experience in the inaugural class of Beckman Scholars.

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Under Pressure

Unravelling the mystery of a fundamental property of lithium.

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2017 Churchill Scholar

Michael Zhao - Mathematics major and student researcher.

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2016 Churchill Scholar

Mackenzie Simper - Mathematics major and student researcher.

Read More

 

 

Masks for U

Spread the word, not the virus.

As faculty, staff and students slowly return to campus we are asking everyone in the community to take the utmost caution to avoid the spread of COVID-19. This includes wearing face coverings and maintaining appropriate physical distancing. The university will be providing face coverings to all faculty and staff to help make this possible.

Print & Mail Services will distribute the masks directly to departments. We hope to have the masks delivered in two weeks. Check with your department staff for availability.

The University is launching a campaign to remind people of the importance of wearing face coverings and maintaining social distancing. The campaign features members of the campus community wearing appropriate face coverings with messaging about how to stay safe while on campus.

Departments will be able to place orders with Print & Mail Services for posters, A-frames, floor signs and other items with the campaign messaging. You can also get more information about staying safe on campus here.

We are all anxious for things to return to normal. However, that cannot happen until we stop the spread of COVID-19 on campus and in the greater Salt Lake City area.

We can do that by coming together and protecting ourselves and each other with just a few small changes to our normal routines.

Remember, we are all One U.



>> HOME <<

Dean’s Update

From the Dean


June 12, 2020

Dear College of Science Community,

In the wake of the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and countless others, the country continues to respond to racial injustice and the oppressive systems that enable it.  To be clear, the College of Science stands in solidarity with the Black community, and supports the University in its efforts to address pervasive racism.

In recent days, I have heard from many of you about actionable ideas to advocate for equity for all. Effective action requires sustained dialog, and I will continue to listen to your ideas, as I formulate plans of action with your department chairs.  I am committed to working with all of you to implement and sustain meaningful change toward a better, more equitable future.

 

Sincerely,

Peter Trapa

 

 

 


Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Committee

Working together for a better tomorrow.

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Arie Sitthichai Mobley, BS’00

The Jackson Laboratory

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Michelle Williams, PhD’87

Distinguished Chemistry Alumni 2019

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The Gandhis, BS’86, 91, 92

The Gandhi family is U - through and through.

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Dominique Pablito

Zuni, Navajo and Comanche, student majoring in chemistry and biology.

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2020 Churchill Scholar

Michael Xiao brings home the U's fifth straight Churchill Scholarship.

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Ana Rosas

Medicine is a family tradition for the Rosas.

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Alex Acuna

Bridging the knowledge gap with networks of people.

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Sahar Kanishka

A freshman perspective.

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Tino Nyawelo

I see myself in those kids who are brought here as refugees.

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