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Science Top Stories

  • Daniel WikSolving a Cosmic Mystery

    Daniel Wik, Assistant Professor of Physics & Astronomy, helped conclude a study using data from NASA’s NuSTAR space telescope to confirm that Eta Carinae, the most luminous and massive stellar system within 10,000 light-years, is accelerating particles to ultra-high energies. Some of the particles could reach Earth as cosmic rays.

  • Akil NarayanThere’s an App for That

    Akil Narayan, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, is also a computer scientist who combines his expertise to develop computational tools and software. Recently, Narayan helped biomedical engineers at the U build a simulation codebase for understanding how physiological factors influence the ability of human blood to carry and release oxygen. The codebase used mathematical work that Narayan had developed to understand optimal ways to build computational emulators for physical models.

  • Rodrigo NoriegaDesigning More Efficient Electronics

    Rodrigo Noriega, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, uses ultrafast laser pulses and his interdisciplinary training to tackle tough problems in energy science. “My scientific interests are at the intersections of chemistry, physics, materials science, and biology – which requires a variety of complementary tools,” says Noriega.

  • Bryn DentingerA Valuable Human Symbiont

    Bryn Dentinger, Associate Professor of Biology, focuses his research on fungal diversity and coevolution. He also is the Curator of Mycology at the Natural History Museum of Utah where he has established a fungus collection already numbering about 500 specimens. His goal is to build a permanent collection with thousands of specimens to document fungi in Utah and worldwide.

  • Aaron BertramFaculty Spotlight: Aaron Bertram

    Aaron Bertram, professor of mathematics, recently was awarded a 2018 fellowship from the Simons Foundation, which will allow him to continue research in his specialty area of algebraic geometry. Bertram will be studying questions about moduli or meta-geometry, in which points in a meta-space represent different curved spaces. The Simons Foundation named 40 mathematicians and 12 theoretical physicists from universities across the United States and Canada for its 2018 awards.

  • Hodan AbdiYoung woman goes from refugee camp to medical school in 5 years

    SALT LAKE CITY — Just five years ago, Hodan Abdi, a petite, 18-year-old Somalian, left an Ethiopian refugee camp and headed to the U.S. armed with only five years of formal education and English language skills she acquired while watching movies. On Thursday, she will graduate from the University of Utah with a chemistry degree. Later this summer she will begin medical school at the University of Minnesota.

  • Christopher HaconNational Academy of Sciences

    Distinguished professor of mathematics Christopher Hacon, who has significantly advanced the field of algebraic geometry, was elected May 1 as a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Hacon is among 84 U.S. scientist-scholars and 21 foreign associates from 15 countries elected at the Academy’s Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. He joins 20 other current University of Utah researchers who’ve been elected to one of the three National Academies, which also include the National Academy of Engineering and National Academy of Medicine. The National Academies recognize scholars and researchers for significant achievements in their fields and advise the federal government and other organizations about science, engineering and health policy. With today’s elections, the number of National Academy of Sciences members stands at 2,382, with 484 foreign associates.

  • Sophie CaronFaculty Spotlight: Sophie Caron

    Sophie Caron, an Assistant Professor of Biology, will present a “Science Night Live” talk on April 4 at the Sky Lounge, 149 Pierpont Ave, 6 p.m. She will discuss how the brain – and in particular neuronal networks – is organized to provide both the flexibility and specificity required for memory formation. The event is free and open to the public. Must be 21. Call Paige Berg for details at (801) 587-8098 or berg@science.utah.edu.

  • Ryan LooperA New Class of Antibiotics

    Curza is a pharmaceutical startup company focused on small-molecule therapeutics. The company is in the early stages of developing two novel classes of antibiotics. Curza's technology originates from the laboratories of Ryan Looper, in Chemistry, and Dustin Williams at the University of Utah. CARB-X - the Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Biopharmaceutical Accelerator - is funding Curza of Salt Lake City to support the development of a new class of antibiotics to treat a broad spectrum of life-threatening Gram-negative bacteria that are resistant to existing antibiotics.

  • Rebecca Hardenbrook2018 College of Science Research Scholar Award

    The College of Science Research Scholar Award is given annually to one graduating student the graduating class who demonstrates a record of exceptional success in research and education. From the Class of 2018, we have selected Rebecca Hardenbrook, a highly-accomplished student who is graduating with a bachelor’s degrees in Mathematics this year.

Last Updated: 12/21/16